Peroxide Formers


List A
Peroxides from Storage
 

List B
Peroxides from Concentration

 
List C
Peroxides from Polymerization
Butadiene *
Chloroprene *
Divinyl acetylene
Isopropyl ether
Potassium amide
Potassium metal
Sodium amide
Tetrafluoroethylene *
Vinyldiene chloride

 

 

* Indicates a peroxide
former when stored
as a liquid monomer.

 

Acetal
Acetalaldehyde
Benzyl alcohol
Chlorofluoroethylene
Cumene (isopropylbenzene)
Cyclohexene
2-Cyclohexen-1-ol
Cyclopentene
Decahydronaphthalene (decalin)
Diacetylene (butadiyne)
Dicyclopentadiene
Diethylene glycol dimethyl ether (diglyme)
Dioxane
Ethyl ether
Furan
4-Heptanol
2-Hexanol
Methyl acetylene
3-Methyl-1-butanol
Methyl-isobutyl ketone
Methylcyclopentane
2-Pentanol
4-Penten-1-ol
Phenylethanol
Tetrahydrofuran
Tetrahydronaphthalene
Vinyl ethers
Other secondary alcohols


Butadiene **
Chlorobutadiene
Chloroprene **
Chlorotrifluoroethylene
Styrene
Tetrafluoroethylene **
Vinyl acetate
Vinyl acetylene
Vinyl chloride
Vinyl pyridine
Vinyldiene chloride

 

** Can form explosive
levels of peroxides
if stored as a liquid.
When stored as gas,
peroxide accumulation
may cause autopoly-
merization.


 

List A chemicals should be tested for peroxide formation before using or discarded after 3 months.

List B chemicals should be tested for peroxides before distillation or evaporation and tested for peroxide formation or discarded after 1 year.

List C chemicals should be tested for peroxide formation or discard liquids aftter 6 months; and gases after 1 year.

References
Clark, Donald E., Peroxides and Peroxide Forming Compounds, 2000. Texas A&M University. Boston University, //www.bu.edu/EHS

Lab Safety |OH&S